September 16, 2016

Our most popular and useful books for carers

 These resources are available for loan to members of AANSW - if you would like to reserve them please email the Library on nsw.library@alzheimers.org.au



Creating moments of joy : for the person with Alzheimer's or dementia
When a person has short-term memory loss, his life is made up of moments. We are not able to create a perfectly wonderful day with those who have dementia, but it is absolutely attainable to create perfectly wonderful moments—moments that put smiles on their faces, a twinkle in their eyes, or trigger memories. Five minutes later, they won’t remember what you did or said, but the feeling you left them with will linger.



Loving someone who has dementia : how to find hope while coping with stress and grief

Research-based advice for people who care for someone with dementia. It's not about the usual techniques, but about how to manage on-going stress and grief. Dr  Boss helps caregivers find hope in "ambiguous loss" having a loved one both here and not here, physically present but psychologically absent. Outlines seven guidelines to stay resilient while caring for someone who has dementia. Discusses the meaning of relationships with individuals who are cognitively impaired and no longer as they used to be. Offers approaches to understand and cope with the emotional strain of care-giving. Boss's book builds on research and clinical experience, yet the material is presented as a conversation. She shows you a way to embrace rather than resist the ambiguity in your relationship with someone who has dementia.



When a family member has dementia : steps to becoming a resilient caregiver

Caring for a person with dementia is a difficult and often- overwhelming task. In addition to the inevitable decline in memory and physical function, most persons with dementia develop one or more troublesome behaviour problems, such as depression, fearfulness, sleep disturbances, paranoia, or physical aggression at some point in their disease. Behavioural challenges in dementia are highly idiosyncratic. No two patients are alike, and interventions that work well with one person are often ineffective with another. Caregivers often become stuck: either unable to figure out how best to help their loved one, or unable to consistently implement positive practices they know would improve their situation. This book offers caregivers a set of practical and flexible tools to enable them become more resilient in the face of difficulty and change. McCurry teaches caregivers how to take advantage of their own creativity and inner resources to develop strategies that will work in their unique situations. She presents her set of five core principles and then brings them to life through vignettes. Anyone who lives, works, or comes in contact with a person who has dementia will benefit from this volume.














The selfish pig's guide to caring

Be ing a carer is long, lonely and hard, yet there is limited support and formal training. As a result, carers suffer frequent damage to physical and mental health. Oddly, though carers by definition are anything but selfish pigs, they are liable to feelings of guilt, probably brought on by fatigue and isolation. So Hugh Marriott has written this book for them - and also for the rest of us who don’t know what being a carer is all about. His aim is bring into the open everything he wishes he'd been told when he first became a carer. And he does. The book airs such topics as sex, thoughts of murder, and dealing with the responses of friends and officials who fail to understand.


Talking to Alzheimer's : simple ways to connect when you visit with a family member or friendAlzheimer's can have a devastating impact on a patient's close relationships and all too often, family members and friends feel so uncomfortable that they end up dreading visits, or simply give up trying to stay in contact with the patient. This book offers a wealth of practical things you can do to stay connected with the Alzheimer's patient in your life. It offers straightforward suggestions and invaluable do's and don'ts, with advice on everything from dealing effectively with the inevitable repetition that occurs in conversations with an Alzheimer's patient to helpful strategies for saying no to unrealistic demands. It also includes thoughtful tips to remind you to take care of your own feelings and suggestions for helping children become comfortable with visiting.


Mom's OK, she just forgets : the Alzheimer's journey from denial to acceptance
These and similar expressions of denial are often heard in families struggling with the difficult challenges of Alzheimer’s or dementia in a loved one. Denial may seem to be an acceptable coping mechanism when faced with a disease that has no cure. But in fact the failure to accept reality can work against the welfare of the person suffering from a disease that causes dementia, making a bad situation worse for the whole family. Young suggest various behaviours, tools, and techniques for moving beyond denial. Real people who have faced the many problems brought about by Alzheimer’s speak out, with hope, from these pages. They share their journeys from denial to loving action and an improved attitude that helps them deal with their personal plights.















A funny thing happened on the way to the nursing home: a different handbook for carers of dementia patients

This short, funny book- is a series of snapshots rather than a handbook as such. It describes, with a mixture of humour and pathos, some of the experiences of caring for a spouse with dementia, and in so doing imparts practical and useful advice. It is one person's view of how to manage an increasingly common problem, and explains why a sense of humour, and indeed a sense of the ridiculous, are very necessary attributes for surviving the caring process.
 The author's methods of managing his wife's difficult behaviour are excellent examples of lateral quick thinking. Dealing with an imagined visit from a duchess at 2 am, or the urgent need to plant a tree in the middle of the dining room floor, requires a good imagination and fast footwork - it contains some useful ideas for dealing with some of the more difficult behaviours associated with the dementing process.











 
Relate, motivate, appreciate: a Montessori approach : promoting positive interaction with people with dementia
Relate, Motivate, Appreciate model: Relate The person you know has lived a rich and full life. They may have been a parent, spouse, brother, sister, professional, housewife, friend and/or lover. The first and most important step is to be able to relate to and focus on what were their past experiences. Motivate Most of us are motivated by things we enjoy. When considering activities that the person might enjoy, we need to reflect on their past life experience. What activities did they do in the past? For example, did they enjoy: • cooking? – if so, consider pouring or mixing activities • accounting? – counting, writing , gardening? – growing vegetables or flowers • music? – listening, dancing, playing an instrument. Appreciate You may experience feelings of loss and grief for the relationship you once had with the person living with dementia. With these in mind it is important that we try to give the person some confidence and roles back and, in that sense, return some meaning to their lives. The aim should be to enable the person living with dementia to regain control of aspects of their life, through meaningful activities that have a purpose..

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