March 16, 2016

Person centred thinking ....

 

What the Hell Happened to My Brain? : Dementia and Me

Kate Swaffer was just 49 years old when she was diagnosed with a form of younger onset dementia. In this book, she offers an all-too-rare first-hand insight into that experience, sounding a clarion call for change in how we ensure a better quality of life for people with dementia. Kate describes vividly her experiences of living with dementia, exploring the effects of memory difficulties, loss of independence, leaving long-term employment, the impact on her teenage sons, and the enormous impact of the dementia diagnosis on her sense of self. Never shying away from difficult issues, she tackles head-on stigma, inadequacies in care and support, and the media's role in perpetuating myths about dementia, suggesting ways in which we can include and empower people with the diagnosis. She also reflects on the ways in which her writing and dementia advocacy work have taken her on a process of self-discovery and enabled her to develop a new and meaningful personal identity. Kate's powerful words will challenge misconceptions about dementia, and open our eyes to new ways of supporting people with the diagnosis. A must read for people with dementia and their families as well as for professionals and carers.



Person centred thinking with older people : 6 essential practices


 Person-centred practices are a key way to provide the best possible care and support for older people and help them to be active and valued members of the community.

Each of the practices is designed to support the individual and put what is important to and for the person at the forefront of their care.
Each practice has been tailored so that older people can express more easily what does and does not work for them. By actively listening and making each person feel appreciated, the practices represent practical tools for frontline practitioners to form good relationships with people in their care. With supporting stories and full colour photographs to illustrate how person-centred thinking and practice is used in real-life settings, there are many examples to help practitioners to overcome challenges and to really implement positive, effective changes to care. This practical book will be a valuable resource for care staff, social workers and healthcare workers who want to learn about person-centred practices to deliver best practice care and support.
* Introduction. 1. One-page profiles. 2. Relationship circles. 3. Communication. 4. Histories. 5. Wishing. 6. Working and not working. 7. Person-centred thinking and care and support planning. 8. Circles of support. Final Thoughts.

Who will I be when I die?
Christine Bryden
This is the 2nd updated edition of the original Who will I be when I die? which was written in 1998.

'Who will I be when I die?' is the beginning of the story of Christine Bryden's  emotional, physical and spiritual journey since her diagnosis.  Christine is living positively with dementia, and provides a unique insight into how it feels to be gradually losing the ability to undertake tasks most of us take for granted. Her story is remarkable because of the vigour with which she is undertaking this battle in her life and her deep sense that her life continues to have purpose and meaning. Christine's approach to health and well-being has made this book a must for many people with dementia and their families.




Dancing with dementia : my story of living positively with dementia
Christine Bryden

This book is a vivid account of the author's experiences living with dementia, exploring the effects of memory problems, loss of independence, difficulties in communication and the exhaustion of coping with simple tasks. She describes how, with the support of her husband, Paul, she continues to lead an active life nevertheless, and explains how professionals and caregivers can help.




Loving someone who has dementia : how to find hope while coping with stress and grief
by Pauline Boss
Research-based advice for people who care for someone with dementia. When Someone You Love Has Dementia is a new kind of caregiving book. It's not about the usual techniques, but about how to manage on-going stress and grief. Dr. Boss helps caregivers find hope in "ambiguous loss" having a loved one both here and not here, physically present but psychologically absent. Outlines seven guidelines to stay resilient while caring for someone who has dementia. Discusses the meaning of relationships with individuals who are cognitively impaired and no longer as they used to be. Offers approaches to understand and cope with the emotional strain of care-giving. Boss's book builds on research and clinical experience, yet the material is presented as a conversation. She shows you a way to embrace rather than resist the ambiguity in your relationship with someone who has dementia.





These resources are available for loan to members of AANSW - if you would like to reserve them please email the Library on nsw.library@alzheimers.org.au

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