March 16, 2016

Keep people with dementia fully engaged in daily life and help them maximize remaining functional skills by tapping into their innate abilities and interests....


Engaging and communicating with people who have dementia : finding and using their strengths


Keep people with dementia fully engaged in daily life and help them maximize remaining functional skills by tapping into their innate abilities and interests.

This book is a trove of advice on how to identify people's strengths and preferences and then use this knowledge to improve activity programming, communication, and functional independence.
Includes these assessment and intervention tools:
  • -Informal geriatric strength-based inventory
  • -Caregiver questionnaire and checklist
  • -Personal preferences inventory
  • -Strength-based summary sheet
  • -SIMPLE (Simplified inventory of multiple potential and leisure engagement)
  • -Dementia care staff guide
  • -Memory loss caregiver guide



Creating moments of joy : for the person with Alzheimer's or dementia
When a person has short-term memory loss, his life is made up of moments. We are not able to create a perfectly wonderful day with those who have dementia, but it is absolutely attainable to create perfectly wonderful moments—moments that put smiles on their faces, a twinkle in their eyes, or trigger memories. Five minutes later, they won’t remember what you did or said, but the feeling you left them with will linger.


It includes tips for dealing with distressed behaviour !

Within the sections are smaller steps. At the end of each step is a place where you can journal your thoughts, solutions, and treasures to help you achieve the overall goal of creating many moments of joy for the person with dementia, and for YOU!





A caregiver's guide to dementia : using activities and other strategies to prevent, reduce and manage behavioural symptoms
Mom has nothing to do—I’m concerned about her quality of life.”
“My husband gets agitated when I need to leave the house—
I don’t know what to do.”
“My father keeps asking the same questions over and over.”


These are some of the common challenges encountered by individuals and families who are caring for a parent, spouse or close relative with dementia. This easy-to-use, practical guide is designed to help at-home caregivers navigate these daily challenges. Although there is no cure for dementia or its many behavioral symptoms, there are clear and proven strategies that can be used to enhance the quality of life for persons with dementia—strategies that can make a real difference for their families.
A Caregiver’s Guide to Dementia explores the use of activities and other techniques to prevent, reduce and manage the behavioral symptoms of dementia. Separate sections cover daily activities, effective communication, home safety and difficult behaviors, with explicit strategies to handle] agitation, repetitive questions, acting-out, wandering, restlessness, hoarding, resistance to care, incontinence, destructiveness, sexually and socially inappropriate acts at home and in public, aggressiveness, depression. Worksheets are provided to help caregivers customize the strategies that work best for them.
The strategies featured in this guide have been used by the authors in their research and reflect approaches and techniques that families have found to be most helpful.



Aniseed balls, billy carts and clothes lines : an abc of growing up in the thirties [book and CD set]
by Roly Chapman
Roly Chapman was born to English parents in Auchenflower, Brisbane in 1926. His reminiscences of growing up in the 1930s will bring a smile to many readers both young and old.
With chapters covering diverse and intriguing subjects such as The Flicks, Cracker Night, The Ekka, Hawking and Spitting, Made in Japan, The Rat Gang, Jargon, and Dunnies and Dunny men, there are lots of laughs and many memories awaiting rediscovery.
The entertaining topics are also of historical interest, documenting aspects of every day life in the 1930s that today have been all but forgotten and are quite foreign to children of the 21st century.

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