October 06, 2015

books to support carers of individuals with dementia



Forgetiquette
What to do when someone you love begins to forget. Having a loved one with memory loss is no laughing matter, but a little humour can help. With her sage advice and trademark irreverence, Joan Sauers helps to relieve the frustration of dealing with dementia sufferers while offering practical advice that will help you help them. Above all she reminds you that, though it may feel like the loneliest job in the world, you are not alone, a very quick and helpful read!



Creating moments of joy : for the person with Alzheimer's or dementia
When a person has short-term memory loss, his life is made up of moments. We are not able to create a perfectly wonderful day with those who have dementia, but it is absolutely attainable to create perfectly wonderful moments—moments that put smiles on their faces, a twinkle in their eyes, or trigger memories. Five minutes later, they won’t remember what you did or said, but the feeling you left them with will linger.

Within the sections are smaller steps. At the end of each step is a place where you can journal your thoughts, solutions, and treasures to help you achieve the overall goal of creating many moments of joy for the person with dementia, and for YOU!


Contented dementia : 24-hour wraparound care for lifelong well-being
Dementia is a little-understood and currently incurable illness, but much can be done to maximise the quality of life for people with the condition. "contented dementia" - by clinical psychologist and author Oliver James - outlines a ground breaking and practical method for managing dementia that will allow both sufferer and carer to maintain the highest possible quality of life, throughout every stage of the illness. A person with dementia will experience random and increasingly frequent memory blanks relating to recent events. Feelings, however, remain intact, as do memories of past events and both can be used in a special way to substitute for more recent information that has been lost. The SPECAL method (specialized early care for Alzheimer's) outlined in this book works by creating links between past memories and the routine activities of daily life in the present. Drawing on real-life examples and user-friendly tried-and-tested methods...


Communicating Across Dementia: How to Talk, Listen, Provide Stimulation and Give Comfort

Information and advice for making vital communication easier and more effective.

If someone close to you has dementia (Alzheimer's Disease is the most common type) they need your help. You will know that communication has become more difficult and frustrating. This jargon-free book explains why this happens and how you can make important improvements by re-thinking your whole approach. Areas covered include:
- Creating the right conditions for good communication
- Making conversation easier
- Non-verbal communication
- Adaptations to the home
- Finding stimulating activities
- Dealing with difficult situations

Looking after a person with dementia involves many challenges. Good and effective communication can help to make these challenges more manageable and greatly reduce stress levels, both in the person with dementia and in his or her carer.


The emotional journey of the Alzheimer's family
The disease profoundly affects immediate family members, close friends, and neighbours. These people—the Alzheimer’s family—undergo tremendous psychological and emotional change as they witness the cruel and relentless progression of the disease in their loved one.

Incorporating over thirty years of experience with Alzheimer’s patients and their families with current medical knowledge, the authors chart the complex emotional journey of the Alzheimer’s family from the onset of the disease through the death of the loved one. They discuss the anger that rises in the face of discordant views of the disease, the defences that emerge when family members are unwilling to accept a dementia diagnosis, and the common emotions of anxiety, guilt, anger, and shame. They focus especially on grief as the core response to losing a loved one to dementia, and describe the difficult processes of adaptation and acceptance, which lead to personal growth. Final chapters emphasize the importance of establishing a care community and how to understand and cope with personal stress.

This volume will be useful to medical professionals and ordinary people close to or caring for a person with dementia.



Where memories go : why dementia changes everything
Regarded as one of the finest journalists of her generation, Mamie Baird Magnusson’s whole life was a celebration of words – words that she fought to retain in the grip of a disease which is fast becoming the scourge of the 21st century. Married to writer and broadcaster Magnus Magnusson, they had five children of whom Sally is the eldest. As well as chronicling the anguish, the frustrations and the unexpected laughs and joys that she and her sisters experienced while accompanying their beloved mother on the long dementia road, Sally Magnusson seeks understanding from a range of experts and asks penetrating questions about how we treat older people and what it means to be human. An extraordinary memoir and manifesto in one searingly beautiful narrative.
 
*These and other similar resources are available for loan to members of AANSW - if you would like to reserve them please email the Library on nsw.library@alzheimers.org.au

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