September 22, 2015

new resources for for healthcare professionals and family carers

These resources are available for loan to members of AANSW - if you would like to reserve them please email the Library on nsw.library@alzheimers.org.au


The ethics of sex and Alzheimer's
Alzheimer’s punishes not only its victims but also those married to them. This book analyses how Alzheimer’s is quietly transforming the way we think about love today. Without meaning to become rebels, many people who find themselves "married to Alzheimer’s" deflate the predominant notion of a conventional marriage. By falling in love again before their ill spouse dies, those married to Alzheimer’s come into conflict with central values of Western civilization – personal, sexual, familial, religious, and political. Those who wait sadly for a spouse’s death must sometimes wonder if the show of fidelity is necessary and whom it helps.
Most books on Alzheimer’s focus on those who have it, as opposed to those who care for someone with it. This book offers a powerful and searching meditation on the extent to which someone married to Alzheimer’s should be expected to suffer loneliness. The diagnosis of dementia should not amount to a prohibition of sexual activity for both spouses. Portmann encourages readers to risk honesty in assessing the moral dilemma, using high-profile cases such as Nancy Reagan and Justice Sandra Day O'Connor to illustrate the enormity of the problem. Ideal for classes considering the ethics of aging and sexuality.


Jan's story : love lost to the long goodbye of Alzheimer's

"...Eventually, Petersen made a decision that is often privately made but rarely discussed. He felt his only chance of survival was to find new love..."

Barry Petersen, long-time CBS news correspondent, has an impressive list of endorsements for his book, including testimonies from Katie Couric, Brian Williams, and Rosalynn Carter.

This is a love story with a controversial and important ending.

Petersen and his wife met and quickly fell passionately in love. Their marriage was enduring and happy as they shared his life as a traveling correspondent. Then came the diagnosis that would explain Jan’s changing behaviour. Beautiful, vivacious, smart Jan was diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

Jan and Barry faced the challenge bravely, holding hands literally and figuratively as they fought this intruder. Eventually, it became obvious he couldn’t keep Jan safe and still work. With the blessing of Jan’s family, Petersen found an excellent assisted living centre for Jan in. The decision to move her was agonizing.

Jan continued to deteriorate and no longer knew “her Barry.” She knew a man called Barry, but he was a younger man whom she had loved. This man visiting her was a stranger. Depression gripped Petersen so severely that family and friends were concerned about his mental health.

Eventually, Petersen made a decision that is often privately made but rarely discussed. He felt his only chance of survival was to find new love. He met a widow who had loved her spouse as much as he loved Jan. They became a couple, with the blessings of most of Jan’s family and friends.


Lewy body dementia: information for patients, families, and professionals
Lewy body dementia (LBD) is a complex, challenging, and surprisingly common brain disease. Although lesser known than its “cousins” Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, LBD is not a rare disorder. More than 1 million Americans are affected by its disabling changes in the ability to think and move. This 40-page booklet helps people with LBD, their families, and professionals learn more about the disease and resources for coping.


101 more training games
Features 101 games which are suitable for a wide variety of training programs in small and large companies, private and public organisations.  Games are self-contained, so each provides its own aims, instructions, list of materials where needed, and space for your personal notes.  Applications for games include icebreakers and energisers; the development and refinement of team building; communication; presentation; problem-solving; learning; perception; evaluation and self-management skills.



Loving – the essence of being a butterfly in dementia care
"this is not a book on activities but on connecting to the essence of living "...
This book is the seventh in Dementia Care Matters’ Feelings Matter Most series which focuses on changing cultures in dementia care homes. Loving, the essence of being a butterfly offers a practical approach on how to increase connections with people living with a dementia. The book identifies what it takes to ensure the essence of living is at the heart of a care home. The metaphor of a ‘Butterfly’ is used to describe the way in which people can connect in a variety of ways throughout the day, bringing colour and being loving to ‘care’. Each essence of being a butterfly in dementia care is explained and includes a wide range of simple but effective ideas for transforming a care home
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A caregiver's guide to dementia : using activities and other strategies to prevent, reduce and manage behavioural symptoms
Mom has nothing to do—I’m concerned about her quality of life.”
“My husband gets agitated when I need to leave the house—
I don’t know what to do.”
“My father keeps asking the same questions over and over.”

These are some of the common challenges encountered by individuals and families who are caring for a parent, spouse or close relative with dementia. This easy-to-use, practical guide is designed to help at-home caregivers navigate these daily challenges. Although there is no cure for dementia or its many behavioral symptoms, there are clear and proven strategies that can be used to enhance the quality of life for persons with dementia—strategies that can make a real difference for their families.
A Caregiver’s Guide to Dementia explores the use of activities and other techniques to prevent, reduce and manage the behavioral symptoms of dementia. Separate sections cover daily activities, effective communication, home safety and difficult behaviors, with explicit strategies to handle] agitation, repetitive questions, acting-out, wandering, restlessness, hoarding, resistance to care, incontinence, destructiveness, sexually and socially inappropriate acts at home and in public, aggressiveness, depression. Worksheets are provided to help caregivers customize the strategies that work best for them.
The strategies featured in this guide have been used by the authors in their research and reflect approaches and techniques that families have found to be most helpful.

 
 

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