September 16, 2015

books and CDs to support carers


 

These resources are available for loan to members of AANSW - if you would like to reserve them please email the Library on nsw.library@alzheimers.org.au

How to meditate : a practical guide to making friends with your mind

Through five CDs of traditional insights and her personal guidance in 12 sitting sessions, Pema Chodron will help you honestly meet and compassionately relate with your mind as you explore: the basics of mindfulness awareness practice, from proper posture to learning to settle to breathing and relaxation; gentleness, patience, and humor - three ingredients for a well-balanced practice; shamatha (or calm abiding), the art of stabilizing the mind to remain present with whatever arises; and, thoughts and emotions as "sheer delight" - instead of obstacles - in meditation.



Buddha's brain : the practical neuroscience of happiness, love & wisdom book or audio book


Science is now revealing how the flow of thoughts actually sculpts the brain, and more and more, we are learning that it's possible to strengthen positive brain states, to help cope with stress, loss and grief.
By combining breakthroughs in neuroscience with insights from thousands of years of mindfulness practice, you too can use your mind to shape your brain for greater happiness, love, and wisdom.

Buddha's Brain draws on the latest research to show how to stimulate your brain using guided meditations and mindfulness exercises, you'll learn how to activate the brain states of calm, joy, and compassion instead of worry, sorrow, and anger. Most importantly, you will foster positive psychological growth that will literally change the way you live in your day-to-day life.
This book presents an unprecedented intersection of psychology, neurology, and contemplative practice, and is filled with practical tools and skills that you can use everyday to tap the unused potential of your brain and rewire it over time for greater well-being and peace of mind.



Eating on the wild side : the missing link to optimum health

Winner of the 2014 IACP Cookbook Award in the category of "Food Matters."

The next stage in the food revolution--a radical way to select fruits and vegetables and reclaim the flavour and nutrients we've lost.

Ever since farmers first planted seeds 10,000 years ago, humans have been destroying the nutritional value of their fruits and vegetables. Unwittingly, we've been selecting plants that are high in starch and sugar and low in vitamins, minerals, fibre, and antioxidants for more than 400 generations.

EATING ON THE WILD SIDE reveals the solution--choosing modern varieties that approach the nutritional content of wild plants but that also please the modern palate. Jo Robinson explains that many of these newly identified varieties can be found in supermarkets and farmer's market, and introduces simple, scientifically proven methods of preparation that enhance their flavour and nutrition. Based on years of scientific research and filled with food history and practical advice, EATING ON THE WILD SIDE will forever change the way we think about food.

How to age
As a culture, we are increasingly 'anti-age'. Ageing is either identified entirely with disability, dependency and isolation or, conversely, with the model of the bungee-jumping, jet-skiing, Botoxed baby-boomer who has vanquished age altogether; it is either all-defining or non-existent because powerful treatments have triumphed over the ageing process itself. Both are manifestations of the same fear. In How to Age, Anne Karpf asks what it would mean to be 'pro-age'. She maps out a different approach to ageing, one that challenges the two sets of attitudes that now so saturate our thinking and recognises that ageing is an inevitable part of the human condition, an important process that has to be acknowledged and accepted in order for us to live our lives as fully as possible, but should not be the prism through which we view ourselves or others. In this practical, inspiring book, Anne draws upon science, history and personal experience to reveal that the great challenge of ageing turns out to be none other than the challenge of living. And the real meaning of ageing well, if such a concept has any value, is living an engaged life: to experience as wide a range of human emotions and experiences as possible.

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