February 04, 2015

Stories for adults and children which feature dementia

These resources are available for loan to members of AANSW - if you would like to reserve them please email the Library on nsw.library@alzheimers.org.au

Elizabeth Is Missing: A Novel
by Emma Healey
An elderly woman descending into dementia embarks on a desperate quest to find the best friend she believes has disappeared, and her search for the truth will go back decades and have shattering consequences.
Maud, an aging grandmother, is slowly losing her memory—and her grip on everyday life. Yet she refuses to forget her best friend Elizabeth, whom she is convinced is missing and in terrible danger.
But no one will listen to Maud—not her frustrated daughter, Helen, not her caretakers, not the police, and especially not Elizabeth's mercurial son, Peter.


Amour [DVD]
This film by Michael Haneke explores death, ageing and the fear of loss. Anne and George (Emmanuelle Riva and Jean-Louis Trintignant) are a couple in their 80s who are enjoying their retirement, but that changes when, after an operation following a stroke, Anne is left wheelchair-bound and paralysed. Although she expresses her wish to die, even going so far as to make an attempt at taking her own life, George tries to remind her of the beauty and worth of life itself and the love that they share for each other. The feature won the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film and received BAFTAs for Best Film Not in the English Language and Best Leading Actress (Riva).

Still Alice
by Lisa Genova
This is the book that the current movie, starring Julianne Moore, is based on.
Alice Howland is proud of the life she worked so hard to build. A Harvard professor, she has a successful husband and three grown children. When she begins to grow forgetful, she dismisses it for as long as she can, but when she gets lost in her own neighbourhood she knows that something has gone terribly wrong. She finds herself in the rapidly downward spiral of Alzheimer's Disease. She is fifty years old. Suddenly she has no classes to teach, no new research to conduct, no invited lectures to give. Ever again. Unable to work, read and, increasingly, take care of herself, Alice struggles to find meaning and purpose in her everyday life as her concept of self gradually slips away. But Alice is a remarkable woman, and her family, yoked by history and DNA and love, discover more about her and about each other, in their quest to keep the Alice they know for as long as possible. Losing her yesterdays, her short-term memory hanging on by a couple of frayed threads, she is living in the moment, living for each day. But she is still Alice.

The forever whale
by Sarah Lean
This book is suitable for 8-12 year olds.
Hannah adores her Grandad. The trouble is, Grandad has Alzheimer's and he’s always forgetting things. He keeps trying to tell Hannah a story about a whale, and it seems really important, but it’s all jumbled up. Then Grandad has a stroke and he can’t remember anything, not even Hannah. It’s like he’s lost inside himself. Determined to get Grandad back, Hannah sets out to make a film that will remind him of his life – and in so doing, starts to piece together an extraordinary story about a whale that connects Grandad’s childhood to her own.

Lucas and Jack
by Ellie Royce and Andrew McLean
Picture book for primary school children.
Every week Lucas' mum visits Great Grandpop at the nursing home. And every week Lucas waits for her outside. Waiting is boring! Until Lucas meets Jack. Jack is tricky and Jack is fun, and he is a great storyteller.


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