September 18, 2014

Approaches to dementia research and care

These resources are available for loan to members of AANSW - if you would like to reserve them please email the Library on nsw.library@alzheimers.org.au

The Alzheimer conundrum : entanglements of dementia and aging
by Margaret Lock
Based on a careful study of the history of Alzheimer's disease and extensive in-depth interviews with clinicians, scientists, epidemiologists, geneticists, and others, Margaret Lock highlights the limitations and the dissent implicated in the early detection approach. She stresses that one major difficulty is the well-documented absence of behavioral signs of Alzheimer's disease in a significant proportion of elderly individuals, even when Alzheimer neuropathology is present in their brains. This incongruity makes it difficult to distinguish between what counts as normal versus pathological and, further, makes it evident that social and biological processes contribute inseparably to aging. Lock argues that basic research must continue, but it should be complemented by a realistic public health approach available everywhere that will be more effective and more humane than one focused almost exclusively on an increasingly frenzied search for a cure.

How we think about dementia: personhood, rights, ethics, the arts and what they mean for care
Julian C Hughes
Exploring concepts of ageing, personhood, capacity, liberty, best interests and the nature and ethics of palliative care, this book will help those in the caring professions to understand and engage with the thoughts and arguments underpinning the experience of dementia and dementia care.
Dementia is associated with ageing: what is the significance of this? People speak about person-centred care, but what is personhood and how can it be maintained? What is capacity, and how is it linked with the way a person with dementia is cared for as a human being? How should we think about the law in relation to the care of older people? Is palliative care the right approach to dementia, and if so what are the consequences of this view? What role can the arts play in ensuring quality of life for people with dementia?
In answering such questions, Julian Hughes brings our attention back to the philosophical and ethical underpinnings of dementia care, shedding new light on the significance and implications for those in the caring professions, academics and researchers, and those living with dementia and their families.


Dementia care the adaptive response : a stress reductionist approach.
Paul TM Smith
The process of dementia makes the experience of day to day living an acute challenge. This could be mediated with educated and timely inputs and where the caring contract may be negotiated to preserve both dignity and quality of life.
The premise of the adaptive response model is that armed with the knowledge of human systems and their ability to adapt and adjust, and with a firm application and emphasis on person centred approaches to dementia care, then the experience can be enhanced, and living with one of the dementias can be made less traumatic.
This holistic approach proposes a method of using environmental and social psychology to maximise function in the individual and to minimise the negative and destructive elements of the perceived and real environment.
Sections include:
• The biological domain
• The psychological and social domains
• Modern contexts of dementia care
• Stress and adaptive responses
• Adaptive response
• Stress
• Manipulating the social and built environments


No comments:

Latest headlines from Alzheimer's News

Alzheimer's News